My parents traded in my brother’s trombone for a guitar that went unplayed until I picked it up at age 11. I haven’t really set the guitar down since.

I was that boy who locked himself in his room and played for days on end, teaching myself to play guitar by learning Silverchair’s “Frogstomp” and Metallica’s “Master of Puppets” and “…And Justice For All.” When I was 12, I jammed with a friend who nicknamed me “Bedroomrockstar” – a big name for a young boy and a nickname that has stuck.

At 17, my high school teachers offered me class credits to learn how to use a Roland hard disk recorder they had purchased, with the condition of teaching others to record. There was also a guitar class offered by the school, and after the first few months, I was teaching parts of the class alongside the teacher, who then had me performing in assemblies and various special events. Those experiences got me through high school and are credited for keeping me in music. (Thanks Kevin and Janine!)
Through the recording block at school, I wrote, recorded and produced the first album for my band Five Minutes to Live. Remaining the primary songwriter as we produced music for the subsequent four years, our 2004 album got radio and internet radio play in the U.S., South America and Europe. We disbanded in 2007 and I moved to France for a year of work and travel.

After years of juggling work, travel and music, I’m releasing my first solo album, an acoustic story about embracing both change and continuity.

I learned music by feeling it, not by studying the notes or lyrics – this is the place I continue to write and play from. I channel my emotions through song, playing what comes to me, regardless of genre. I hope that listeners can find insight, comfort and understanding through my experiences and music.

My parents traded in my brother’s trombone for a guitar that went unplayed until I picked it up at age 11. I haven’t really set the guitar down since.

 

Thanks for being here.